Galwegians Under20s righted the ship second game in with a one-sided demolition of an under-strength Sundays Well, 48 to nil in Cork.

The match was abandoned eight tries and 55minutes in after one of the hosts’ tight-five succumbed to a neck injury and lay stationary until an ambulance arrived. 

While the fixture result was beyond doubt at that stage, the outcome of the injury was unknown when ‘Wegians departed from the playing field but understood the ambulance was a precaution rather than an emergency. Galwegians’ thoughts are with the club and its under20 complement.

From the outset it appeared as if the visitors had their work cut out for them as Sundays Well forced Galwegians to within 10m of their own line, with ‘Well to feed hot on attack. And while ‘Well’s scrum lost a yard and a half on the shunt to a Wegians’ pack boasting several former Irish schoolboys and underage provincial caps, they managed to clear the ball and mount a promising attack on the Blue’s 22m.

A bonejarring hit from youngster Conor Lowndes stopped the movement in its tracks and the none-too-shabby arrival of Jack Dineen (8) and Eddie Earle (7) on the scene immediately fractured the sluggish support and swung the tide in Galwegians’ favour.

Thereafter, the match was largely formulaic and played out one of two ways for the remainder. Galwegians’ forwards in the first instance battered through two or three tackles apiece on most occasions, breaking the gainline with frightening regularity and within three or four phases were feeding free-running backs in open space in the second. 

Earle, Gavin Tynan (10) and Ciaran Gavin at hooker were largely responsible for the lion’s share of easy yards, and Lowndes and Earle proved devastating putting ‘Well runners on the ground – where several stayed.

Dineen’s contribution minding the fringe forced runner after runner several metres back from where they started and the vocal number-eight directed traffic throughout for the Galway tourists.

Down six tries to none at half time with the wind at their backs never bode well for the Cork locals who not only faced the prospect of 40minutes against a team of bruising defenders with a thirst for possession, but one with an ever-stiffening breeze behind them.

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